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Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Absinthe Dinner at Aroma Thyme Bistro in Ellenville NY



Many of you have requested an Absinthe Dinner at Aroma Thyme, and here is the official menu.
Every Course is paired with Absinthe Cocktails. It is shocking how many Absinthe Cocktails recipes are around. We are in the process of experimenting and finalizing the drinks. And of course will demonstrate how to make the classic sugar cube preparation.

And yes, Cheryl Lins, owner and distiller, Delaware Phoenix Distillery in Walton, New York will be present to talk about absinthe and share her first two absinthe brands: Walton Waters and Meadow of Love.

Both are classic absinthe vertes (green absinthes, naturally colored with herbs) based on the core distilled herbs of grand wormwood, anise, fennel and the coloring herbs roman wormwood, hyssop, and lemon balm. Each recipe uses a different, additional herb to send the flavors in a new direction.

Saturday March 7th
$49 Per Person
Reservations 845-647-3000
165 Canal St
Ellenville NY 12428

Roasted Fennel, Potato & Pea Salad
Mild Curry Dressing

Potato Gnocchi, Mushrooms & Lobster
Pernod Sauce

Pork Tenderloin Medallion
Creamy Corn Sauce

Roasted Pineapple ala a mode
St. George Absinthe


Here is a list of the Absinthe that we will be featuring that night:
St George Vert
Kubler
Mata Hari
Grande

Here is the rundown on Absinthe from Wikipedia:

Absinthe is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45%-74% ABV) beverage. It is an anise-flavored spirit derived from herbs, including the flowers and leaves of the herb Artemisia absinthium, commonly referred to as "grande wormwood". Absinthe traditionally has a natural green color but can also be colorless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte" (the Green Fairy).

Although it is sometimes mistakenly called a liqueur, absinthe was not bottled with added sugar and is therefore classified as a liquor.Absinthe is unusual among spirits in that it is bottled at a very high proof but is normally diluted with water when drunk.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland. It achieved great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Due in part to its association with bohemian culture, absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists. Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, and Aleister Crowley were all notorious bad men of that day who were (or were thought to be) devotees of the Green Fairy.

Absinthe was portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug. The chemical thujone, present in small quantities, was singled out and blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in most European countries except the United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, Portugal, and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Although absinthe was vilified, no evidence has shown it to be any more dangerous than ordinary liquor. Its psychoactive properties, apart from those of alcohol, had been much exaggerated.

A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, when countries in the European Union began to reauthorize its manufacture and sale. As of February 2008, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries, most notably in France, Switzerland, Spain, and the Czech Republic. Commercial distillation of absinthe in the United States resumed in 2007.

1 comment:

Cheryl Lins said...

And yes, Cheryl Lins, owner and distiller, Delaware Phoenix Distillery in Walton, New York will be present to talk about absinthe and share her first two absinthe brands: Walton Waters and Meadow of Love.

Both are classic absinthe vertes (green absinthes, naturally colored with herbs) based on the core distilled herbs of grand wormwood, anise, fennel and the coloring herbs roman wormwood, hyssop, and lemon balm. Each recipe uses a different, additional herb to send the flavors in a new direction.

I look forward to joining you in exploring the exciting flavors of absinthe.

We would never expect you to eat this shrimp, nor do we serve farmed Asian shrimp

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