Ellenville's Number 1 Trip Advisor Restaurant!

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

TAP NY Craft Beer Festival Bus | Trip Sunday April 24th 12pm


TAP NY Craft Beer Festival Bus Trip

Pickup in Rock Hill (Sullivan County), Ellenville and Kingston.

Cost: $100/person

Monday, February 1, 2016

Pratello Wine Dinner| Friday February 26th 7pm



Pratello Wine Dinner

Four Courses paired with  Four Wines
$54 a person

Marcus and Jamie just visited Pratello Winery in November. And they are going to tell you all about their trip. The importer will be on hand to tell us more about the wine. For more inof visit http://www.aromathymebistro.com/pratello-wine-dinner.html

Menu

Chiaretto Rose
Fresh Mozzarella & Grilled Eggplant, White Balsamic Glaze

Riesling
Roasted Butternut Squash Bruschetta, Arugula Salad

Rebo
Slow Braised Boneless Short Ribs, Gorgonzola & Mushroom Risotto 

Lugano
Macapone Cheesecake, Roasted Apples


About Pratello:
The Farm Pratello is located in the hills adjacent to the Garda Lake on the Brescia side. It covers an area of 140 hectares of which 66 hectares are vineyards. Because the area is very hilly part of the holding is reserved for natural forest and the remaining hectares are cultivated with great respect for the environment with cereals. The experience of Vincenzo Bertola and the tradition of Dante Bertola mixed together with the expertise of the agronomist Paolo Di Francesco, is creating great products from these areas.
Each area has been carefully studied by our agronomist Paolo Di Francesco. He has made a structural analysis of the soil, the sun exposure and the microclimate in order to determine what is the best grape to grow while respecting the compatibility with the biological system.
The soil is moraine which is a stony and very loose soil type with some clay, ideal for the cultivation of the vines but with a very low profit per hectare but with great quality.
The fabulous climate of the Garda Lake is working as a thermal accumulator creating a microclimate that is very important for the maturation of the grapes.
All red grapes are grown in a valley around 180 m. above sea level and the white grapes on a gentle hill facing south and around 250 m. above sea level.
Certification under organic farming (Mediterranean Institute of Certification) over the whole area of the company.

About Aroma Thyme:
http://www.hudsonvalleysbestbar.com/
Aroma Thyme has had a Wine Spectator Award-winning wine program since 2003.  It has been their mission to source independently produced wines from all over the world. 
“I love wine” says Chef/Owner Marcus Guiliano. “I taste every single wine that I buy.  I want to make sure I know what we are representing.  I am constantly learning something new in the world of wine. 

Chef Guiliano does not discriminate regions or varietals.  There is a strong focus on New York wines.  Everything from South Africa, France, Italy, France, Spain, Portugal, California, Austria, Germany, Australia and South America have a presence.  All prices ranges are represented. 

Besides wine, Aroma Thyme has one of the best stocked bars period.  The craft beer menu spans over 250 independent craft beers from all over the world.  The list has many hard to find and aged verticals of beers. Plus there are over 300 independently produced spirits.  “The extensive bar selections shock everyone.  We take a lot of pride in hand picking our wines, beers and spirits,” exclaims Chef Guiliano. 

Aroma Thyme is Three Star Certified Green© by The Green Restaurant Association. 
Chef Guiliano has been an advocate for over 15 years on healthy, sustainable, local & real food. Zagat says “Stealth Health”. He found his mission in cooking when he reversed a handful of medical conditions including 28 years of asthma. For more information visit www.chefonamission.com. www.aromathymebistro.com.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Chatham Craft Beer Dinner at Aroma Thyme | Feb 19th 7pm


Chatham Beer Dinner
Feb 19th 7pm
Five Beers, Four Courses
$49 a person
Join us for our February Beer Dinner at Aroma Thyme as we feature local brewery Chatham. 
RSVP (845) 647-3000

Menu

Local Hero Cream Ale 

Slip Switch IPA
Baby Greens, Honey Glazaed Almonds, Blue Cheese & Fig Vinaigrette 

Last Run Barreled Aged IPA
Beer & Brovetto Tilsit Cheese Soup, House Baked Pretzel 

8 Barrel
Seared Duck Breast, Roasted Cauliflower, Sour Cherry Glaze

Imperial Coffee Stout
Banana Bread French Toast, Caramel Sauce & Our House Peanut Butter & Brownie Ice Cream

We are always happy to accomadate special dietary requests like vegan and gluten-free. Please notify us when making the reservation.

First Green Certified© Restaurant in the Hudson Valley. Established in 2003 in Ellenville (Ulster County) NY. Featuring a New American menu with grass-fed steaks, seafood & vegetarian. One of the best stocked bars in the Hudson Valley with 300 craft beers, 300 wines & independent produced spirits. Hudson Valley Magazine “Best Of” winner 10 years in a row. Awards include: Best Beer Menu, Best Chef, Best Bistro, Best Vegetarian, Best of County & Best Wine List. Trip Advisor's #1 restaurant

Aroma Thyme's Cupcake & Wine Valentine's Day Pairing | Saturday , Feb 13th 1pm




A perfect Pair
Saturday, Feb 13th 1 pm
$25 a person
For Pettie Cupcakes paired with 
Wine or Craft Beer Tasting
RSVP (845) 647-3000

Mussel Bowl, Superbowl Sunday Party at Aroma Thyme | Sunday February 7th, 2016



All You Can Eat Mussels $21.99

Mussel Bowl is Back
All You Can Eat Mussels on Super Bowl Sunday
$21.99

Sunday February 7th, 2016
Noon to 10pm

It's back by popular demand! And it's all day at Aroma Thyme Bistro! Stop in before the game or join us for the game. And bring your appetite for Mussels.

Mussels with White Wine, Garlic & EVOO
Mussels Marinara
Green Curry Mussels

Call to make reservations (845) 647-3000

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Aroma Thyme Paint and Sip Night| Tuesday, January 19th at 6:30 pm




Come paint in the new year with a creative toast! 

Tuesday, January 19th at 6:30

$35 to paint

Food & Drinks available 

MUST RSVP to 845-647-3000

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Knee Deep Brewing Craft Beer Dinner | Friday January 22nd, 2016 at 7pm



Knee Deep Beer Dinner
Friday January 22nd, 2016
$49 per person, 7pm


Breaking Bud IPA 6.5%

Hoptologist IIPA 9%
Fondue

Midnight Hoppyness Black IPA 9.5%
Roasted Beetroot Salad, Arugula & Walnut Romano Pesto

Hop Surplus IPA
Roasted Brown Sugar Rubbed Pork Loin
Kale & Sweet Potato Rice Pilaf

Imperial Tanilla 10%
Bourbon Whiskey Panna Cotta
Almond Butter Drizzle

RSVP (845) 647-3000

We are happy to accommodate special dietary requests

Knee Deep Brewing Company was founded in Nevada in June 2010 by brewmaster Jeremy Warren. For the first few months of operation, Knee Deep was “contract brewing” beer at Mt. Tallac Brewing in beautiful Lake Tahoe and selling kegs exclusively into the Northern Nevada (Reno) market.  In September 2010, Jeremy and Jerry Moore (our CEO & Janitor) met, sampled a few of Jeremy’s creations and ultimately agreed to work together to get more than “Knee Deep” in a premium craft beer brewery. For the remainder of 2010, Knee Deep Brewing Company continued to “contract brew” and sell kegs in Northern Nevada.
In the first quarter of 2011, the company reached an agreement to lease the former Beermann’s Brewery in Lincoln, CA.  During the renovation and startup phase, Knee Deep’s beers continued to be contract brewed in another brewery in California.  In May 2011, our first batch of beer was brewed in our Lincoln brewery.  Over time we phased out the contract brewing and eventually all our beers were brewed at our Lincoln facility.  At that time we had two UC Davis trained brewers operating 7 days a week. At first, our beers could be found throughout California and also in Arizona, Nevada, Ohio and Idaho.  In 2012 we had started our “Loading Dock Friday Growler Sales”, where it was possible to purchase a growler of the freshest possible Knee Deep beer directly from the brewery.  Growler sales were, as described, conducted at the loading dock.
Knee Deep Brewing’s brews have received several awards; most notably our Hoptologist DIPA took the Gold Medal in 2013 at The Bistro 14th Annual DIPA Festival. Knee Deep Brewing Company has a rapidly growing reputation and we are becoming known for our unique blends and creative outlook on brewing.  We take pride in our reputation and strive to continue brewing outstanding craft beers.
Fast forward to 2015, Knee Deep beers are now brewed in our new 28,000 square foot facility in Auburn, CA. Our 15 barrel brew house has been replaced with a 40 barrel 4 vessel system. Our 15 barrel fermenters are no more and we now ferment our beers in 60, 90 and 120 barrel tanks. Our year round offerings now total 14 and we also produce special releases and seasonal beers. We are currently in the process of barrel aging a limited quantity of specialty beers, which are periodically released in our taproom. “Loading Dock Fridays” are gone as well. Instead of standing outdoors (rain or shine) to purchase a growler of our beer, visitors can now purchase growlers, crowlers or bottles in our new tasting room, which is larger than our previous Lincoln brewery. Our tasting room offers an unobstructed view of brewery operations, and guests can enjoy samples of our beer while watching us brew, filter or even bottle the finished product. Our current brewmaster, Dean Roberts, has been with us for 3 ½ years and is continuing our tradition of brewing only the finest craft beers.
We have added the states of Michigan, North Carolina, New York, Hawaii, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Oregon. Alberta and British Columbia in Canada have also been added to our distribution network with more to come in 2016. The one thing that will not change at Knee Deep is the quality of our product. We continue to brew great beer and receive recognition and awards both locally and nationally.
Cheers!


Aroma Thyme Bistro
165 Canal St
Ellenville NY 12428

Monday, December 28, 2015

Australian Wine Dinner | Aroma Thyme Bistro | Hudson Valley Restaurant


Australian Wine Dinner
January 29th, 2016

Four course paired wine dinner
$54 per person






Frisk, Victoria Prickly Riesling
Grilled Prawn Cocktail, Kiwi Curry Salsa

GSM Barossa Valley Estate
Creamy Macadamia Nut & Roasted Tomato Soup

Shiraz Barossa Valley Estate
Slow Braised Lamb Shank, Tomatoes, Pineapple,
Roasted Potato Hash

Innocent Bystander
Yarra Valley Pink Moscato
Coconut Pavlova Cake, Winter Berries

RSVP (845) 647-3000

Australia is not only known for its wildlife and nature’s spectacles. It is also famous for its wine, which is sophisticated, elegant and made of high quality grapes. In fact, Australia is the fourth largest wine exporter in the world, thus no wonder Australian wine is an invaluable part of liquor stores in many countries. This is due to unique wine flavours which are a result of distinct wine regions.
But world is not the only one that has acknowledged the beauty of Australian wine. We, as a nation, are recognising all the positive characteristics of our wines as well. Did you know that wine is becoming the drink of choice for many?
Here are few more facts about Australian wine industry that may interest you.
Australia produces more than 1 billion liters of wine each year.
Australia is home to some of the world’s oldest vineyards, which date back to 1850.
The first wine production in Australia was in 1788.
Most popular Australian wine regions are: Barossa Valley, Yarra Valley, McLaren Vale, Hunter Valley, Tamar Valley and Margaret river.
Australia’s oldest wine region is Barossa Valley.
Many Australian vineyards have become major tourist destinations as a result of the increasing wine popularity. These wine tourist destinations also contribute to increasing online wine sales Australia.
Wines from different vineyards feature one-of-a-kind characteristics and are in some sense, trademarks of each wine region. The uniqueness of every climate determines the taste note of each wine. Thus, each region is known for producing certain type of wine.

99 Bottles of Wine on the Bar | Grand Wine Tasting | Hudson Valley Restaurant



99 Bottles of Wine on the Bar
Grand Wine Tasting

Aroma Thyme Bistro
165 Canal St, Ellenville NY
 845-647-73000

Sunday, January 17 2016
General Admission 1-5pm
NEW!  Vip Admission noon to 5pm

  This is our 5th annual
99 Bottles Grand Tasting
This is our BIGGEST wine event ever at Aroma Thyme 
We are lining up 99 bottles of wine on our bar
Tastes wine like the pros. We are doing an all out grand wine tasting. Many of you always ask us about the wine tastings we go to. Well this event is going to be just like that. There will be tons of wine.

Taste this huge array of wines for
GENERAL ADMISSION
1-5pm
$29.99 if purchased by Jan 3rd
$34.99 if purchased online after Jan 3rd
$39.99 tickets at the door on the day of event
 

order tickets online
HERE
 

NEW THIS YEAR.... VIP TICKETS:
noon to 5pm
Taste special reserve wines with Marcus and Jamie
that will not be part of the general tasting
$39.99 before Jan 3rd 
$44.99 after Jan 3rd
$49.99 Day of event at the door     

Get your tickets early and save!

Drink Italian, American, South American, Australian, French, Spain, Portuguese, etc….
Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Zinfandel etc...

This will be our most extensive wine tasting ever at Aroma Thyme.
This is a do not miss event.




About Aroma Thyme: www.WhereBeerDrinkersGo.com
Aroma Thyme has had a Wine Spectator Award-winning wine program since 2003.  It has been their mission to source independently produced wines from all over the world. 
I love wine” says Chef/Owner Marcus Guiliano. “I taste every single wine that I buy.  I want to make sure I know what we are representing.  I am constantly learning something new in the world of wine. 

Chef Guiliano does not discriminate regions or varietals.  There is a strong focus on New York wines.  Everything from South Africa, France, Italy, France, Spain, Portugal, California, Austria, Germany, Australia and South America have a presence.  All prices ranges are represented. 

Besides wine, Aroma Thyme has one of the best stocked bars period.  The craft beer menu spans over 250 independent craft beers from all over the world.  The list has many hard to find and aged verticals of beers. Plus there are over 300 independently produced spirits.  “The extensive bar selections shock everyone.  We take a lot of pride in hand picking our wines, beers and spirits,” exclaims Chef Guiliano. 

Aroma Thyme is Three Star Certified Green© by The Green Restaurant Association. 
Chef Guiliano has been an advocate for over 15 years on healthy, sustainable, local & real food. Zagat says “Stealth Health”. He found his mission in cooking when he reversed a handful of medical conditions including 28 years of asthma. For more information visit

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Celebrate New Years Eve at Aroma Thyme| Thursday, December 31st From 3pm


Celebrate New Years Eve at Aroma Thyme
Ring in the New Year with drinks, dancing, DJ & food
or  
start you night off right with dinner
We have three seatings, 5, 7 and 9pm on New Years Eve.





New Years Eve at Aroma Thyme!
Ring in 2016 with
drinks, dancing, DJ & food during the 9pm Bash
or
start you night off right with dinner
Starting at 3pm

Call To Make reservations and get more details
845-647-3000
It's also Aroma Thyme's Anniversary
Ring in the New Year with us!


Where will you be when the clock strikes 12?
New Years Eve is very special for us because
it is going to be our 12th Year Anniversary

Which marks us going into our 13th Year!
We invite you to join us in celebrating our Anniversary!

Thursday, December 31st

Regular Dinner Menu is available from 4pm-Midnight
Our Big Bash starts at 9pm

Cover charge is $15 per person after 9pm
There will be DJ music, dancing, a dessert bar,
and a champagne toast at midnight!
Call to make Reservations 845-647-3000

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Global supermarkets selling shrimp peeled by slaves





Every morning at 2 a.m., they heard a kick on the door and a threat: Get up or get beaten. For the next 16 hours, No. 31 and his wife stood in the factory that owned them with their aching hands in ice water. They ripped the guts, heads, tails and shells off shrimp bound for overseas markets, including grocery stores and all-you-can-eat buffets across the United States.

After being sold to the Gig Peeling Factory, they were at the mercy of their Thai bosses, trapped with nearly 100 other Burmese migrants. Children worked alongside them, including a girl so tiny she had to stand on a stool to reach the peeling table. Some had been there for months, even years, getting little or no pay. Always, someone was watching.

No names were ever used, only numbers given by their boss — Tin Nyo Win was No. 31.

Pervasive human trafficking has helped turn Thailand into one of the world's biggest shrimp providers. Despite repeated promises by businesses and government to clean up the country's $7 billion seafood export industry, an Associated Press investigation has found shrimp peeled by modern-day slaves is reaching the U.S., Europe and Asia.

The problem is fueled by corruption and complicity among police and authorities. Arrests and prosecutions are rare. Raids can end up sending migrants without proper paperwork to jail, while owners go unpunished.

____

More than 2,000 trapped fishermen have been freed this year as a result of an ongoing Associated Press investigative series into slavery in the Thai seafood industry. The reports also have led to a dozen arrests, millions of dollars' worth of seizures and proposals for new federal laws.

____

Hundreds of shrimp peeling sheds are hidden in plain sight on residential streets or behind walls with no signs in Samut Sakhon, a port town an hour outside Bangkok. The AP found one factory that was enslaving dozens of workers, and runaway migrants led rights groups to the Gig shed and a third facility. All three sheds held 50 to 100 people each, many locked inside.

As Tin Nyo Win soon found out for himself, there's no easy escape. One woman had been working at Gig for eight years. Another man ended up peeling shrimp there after breaking free from an equally brutal factory.

"I was shocked after working there a while, and I realized there was no way out," said Tin Nyo Win, 22, who has a baby face and teeth stained red from chewing betel nut.

"I told my wife, 'We're in real trouble. If something ends up going wrong, we're going to die.'"

Last month, AP journalists followed and filmed trucks loaded with freshly peeled shrimp from the Gig shed to major Thai exporting companies and then, using U.S. customs records and Thai industry reports, tracked it globally. They also traced similar connections from another factory raided six months earlier, and interviewed more than two dozen workers from both sites.

U.S. customs records show the shrimp made its way into the supply chains of major U.S. food stores and retailers such as Wal-Mart, Kroger, Whole Foods, Dollar General and Petco, along with restaurants such as Red Lobster and Olive Garden.

It also entered the supply chains of some of America's best-known seafood brands and pet foods, including Chicken of the Sea and Fancy Feast, which are sold in grocery stores from Safeway and Schnucks to Piggly Wiggly and Albertsons. AP reporters went to supermarkets in all 50 states and found shrimp products from supply chains tainted with forced labor.

European and Asian import and export records are confidential, but the Thai companies receiving shrimp tracked by the AP all say they ship to Europe and Asia as well.

The businesses that responded condemned the practices that lead to these conditions. Many said they were launching investigations when told their supply chains were linked to people held against their will in sheds like the Gig factory, which sat behind a gate off a busy street, between railroad tracks and a river.

Inside the large warehouse, toilets overflowed with feces, and the putrid smell of raw sewage wafted from an open gutter just outside the work area. Young children ran barefoot through suffocating dorm rooms. Entire families labored side-by-side at rows of stainless steel counters piled high with tubs of shrimp.

Tin Nyo Win and his wife, Mi San, were cursed for not peeling fast enough and called "cows" and "buffalos." They were allowed to go outside for food only if one of them stayed behind as insurance against running away.

But escaping was all they could think about.

____

Shrimp is the most-loved seafood in the U.S., with Americans downing 1.3 billion pounds every year, or about 4 pounds per person. Once a luxury reserved for special occasions, it became cheap enough for stir-fries and scampis when Asian farmers started growing it in ponds three decades ago. Thailand quickly dominated the market and now sends nearly half of its supply to the U.S.

The Southeast Asian country is one of the worst human trafficking hubs on earth. It has been blacklisted for the past two years by the U.S. State Department, which cited complicity by Thai officials. The European Union issued a warning earlier this year that tripled seafood import tariffs, and is expected to decide next month whether to impose an outright ban.

Consumers enjoy the convenience of dumping shrimp straight from freezer to skillet, the result of labor-intensive peeling and cleaning. Unable to keep up with demand, exporters get their supply from peeling sheds that are sometimes nothing more than crude garages adjacent to the boss's house. Supply chains are so complicated that, on any given day, buyers may not know exactly where the shrimp comes from.

The Thai Frozen Foods Association lists about 50 registered shrimp sheds in the country. However, hundreds more operate in Samut Sakhon, the country's main shrimp processing region. Here the humid air hangs thick with the smell of dead fish. Refrigerated trucks with seafood logos barrel down streets straddled by huge processing plants. Just as ubiquitous are the small pickups loaded with migrant workers from neighboring Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar being taken to gut, fillet, de-vein and peel the seafood that fuels this town's economy.

Abuse is common in Samut Sakhon. An International Labor Organization report estimated 10,000 migrant children aged 13 to 15 work in the city. Another U.N. agency study found nearly 60 percent of Burmese laborers toiling in its seafood processing industry were victims of forced labor.

Tin Nyo Win and his wife were taken to the Gig Peeling Factory in July when they made the long drive from Myanmar across the border, crammed so tightly into a truck with other workers that they could barely breathe. Like many migrants, they were lured from home by a broker with promises of good-paying jobs, and came without visas or work permits.

After being sold to the Gig shed, the couple learned they would have to work off what was considered their combined worth — $830. It was an insurmountable debt.

Because they were illegal workers, the owners constantly threatened to call police to keep them in line. Even documented migrants were vulnerable because the boss held onto identification papers so they could not leave.

Under the U.S. government's definition, forced labor and debt bondage are considered slavery.

In the Gig shed, employees' salaries were pegged to how fast their fingers could move. Tin Nyo Win and his wife peeled about 175 pounds of shrimp for just $4 a day, less than half of what they were promised. A female Thai manager, who slapped and cursed workers, often cut their wages without explanation. After they bought gloves and rubber boots, and paid monthly "cleaning fees" inside the trash-strewn shed, almost nothing was left.

Employees said they had to work even when they were ill. Seventeen children peeled alongside adults, sometimes crying, at stations where paint chipped off the walls and slick floors were eaten away by briny water.

Lunch breaks were only 15 minutes, and migrants were yelled at for talking too much. Several workers said a woman died recently because she didn't get proper medical care for her asthma. Children never went to school and began peeling shrimp just an hour later than adults.

"We had to get up at 3 in the morning and then start working continuously," said Eae Hpaw, 16, whose arms were a patchwork of scars from infections and allergies caused by the shrimp. "We stopped working around 7 in the evening. We would take a shower and sleep. Then we would start again."

After being roughed up one night by a supervisor, five months into their captivity, Tin Nyo Win and his wife decided they couldn't take the threats anymore.

"They would say, 'There's a gun in the boss's car and we're going to come and shoot you, and no one will know,'" he said.

The next morning, the couple saw an opportunity when the door wasn't being watched.

They ran.

Less than 24 hours later, Tin Nyo Win's wife was captured at a market by the shed manager. He watched helplessly as she was dragged away by her hair, terrified for her — and the baby they recently learned she was carrying.

____

Tracking shipments from just the Gig Peeling Factory highlights how fast and far slave-peeled shrimp can travel.

The AP followed trucks from the shed over five days to major Thai exporters. One load pulled into N&N Foods, owned by one of the world's largest seafood companies, Tokyo-based Maruha Nichiro Foods. A second drove to Okeanos Food, a subsidiary of another leading global seafood supplier, Thai Union. Still more went to Kongphop Frozen Foods and The Siam Union Frozen Foods, which have customers in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Asia and Australia. All the exporters and parent companies that responded said they abhor human rights abuses.

Shrimp can mix with different batches of seafood as it is packaged, branded and shipped. At that point, there's no way to tell where any individual piece was peeled. Once it reaches American restaurants, hospitals, universities and military chow halls, all the shrimp from those four Thai processors is considered associated with slavery, according to United Nations and U.S. standards.

U.S. customs records linked the exported shrimp to more than 40 U.S. brands, including popular names such as Sea Best, Waterfront Bistro and Aqua Star. The AP found shrimp products with the same labels in more than 150 stores across America — from Honolulu to New York City to a tiny West Virginia town of 179 people. The grocery store chains have tens of thousands of U.S. outlets where millions of Americans shop.

In addition, the Thai distributors state on their websites that they export to Europe and Asia, although specific records are confidential. AP reporters in Germany, Italy, England and Ireland researched shrimp in supermarkets and found several brands sourced from Thailand. Those stores said the names of their Thai distributors are proprietary. Royal Greenland — an importer whose shrimp was seen under store brands as a product from Thailand but has not been linked to the sheds — said it now has shifted its sourcing to Ecuador.

By all accounts, the work at the Gig shed was off the books — and thus even businesses carefully tracking the provenance of the shrimp called the AP's findings a surprise.

"I want to eliminate this," said Dirk Leuenberger, CEO of Aqua Star. "I think it's disgusting that it's even remotely part of my business."

Some, including Red Lobster, Whole Foods and H-E-B Supermarkets, said they were confident — based on assurances from their Thai supplier — that their particular shrimp was not associated with abusive factories. That Thai supplier admits it hadn't known where it was getting all its shrimp and sent a note outlining corrective measures to U.S. businesses demanding answers last week.

"I am deeply disappointed that despite our best efforts we have discovered this potential instance of illegal labor practice in our supply chain," Thai Union CEO Thiraphong Chansiri wrote. His statement acknowledged "that illicitly sourced product may have fraudulently entered its supply chain" and confirmed a supplier "was doing business with an unregistered pre-processor in violation of our code of conduct."

After AP brought its findings to dozens of global retailers, Thai Union announced it will bring all shrimp-processing in-house by the end of the year and provide jobs to workers whose factories close as a result. It's a significant step from the industry leader whose international brands include John West in Britain, Petit Navire in France and Mareblu in Italy; shrimp from abusive factories in Thailand has not been associated with them.

Susan Coppedge, the U.S. State Department's new anti-trafficking ambassador, said problems persist because brokers, boat captains and seafood firms aren't held accountable and victims have no recourse.

"We have told Thailand to improve their anti-trafficking efforts, to increase their prosecutions, to provide services to victims," she said. She added that American consumers "can speak through their wallets and tell companies: 'We don't want to buy things made with slavery.'"

The State Department has not slapped Thailand with sanctions applied to other countries with similarly weak human trafficking records because it is a strategically critical Southeast Asian ally. And federal authorities say they can't enforce U.S. laws that ban importing goods produced by forced labor, citing an exception for items consumers can't get from another source. Thai shrimp slips right through that loophole.

Thailand is not the only source of slave-tainted seafood in the U.S., where nearly 90 percent of shrimp is imported.

The State Department's annual anti-trafficking reports have tied such seafood to 55 countries on six continents, including major suppliers to the U.S. Earlier this year, the AP uncovered a slave island in Benjina, Indonesia, where hundreds of migrant fishermen were trafficked from Thailand and sometimes locked in a cage. Last month, food giant Nestle disclosed that its own Thai suppliers were abusing and enslaving workers and has vowed to force change.

Human trafficking in Thailand also stretches far beyond the seafood industry. Earlier this year, high-ranking officials were implicated in a smuggling syndicate involving tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims fleeing persecution in Myanmar. A crackdown came after dozens of victims died in Thai jungle camps because they were unable to pay ransoms.

The junta military government has singled out the country's fisheries sector for reforms. It says it has passed new laws to crack down on illegal activities aboard fishing boats and inside seafood-processing factories and is working to register undocumented migrant workers.

"There have been some flaws in the laws, and we have been closing those gaps," said M.L. Puntarik Smiti, the Thai Labor Ministry's permanent secretary. "The government has made human trafficking a national agenda. The policy is clear, and every department is working in the same direction. ... In the past, most punishments focused on the laborers, but now more focus is put on punishing the employers."

Police point to a new law that goes after officers involved in human trafficking, and say rooting out corruption and complicity is a priority.

Critics argue, however, the changes have been largely cosmetic. Former slaves repeatedly described how police took them into custody and then sold them to agents who trafficked them again into the seafood industry.

"There are laws and regulations, but they are being selectively enforced to benefit one side," said Patima Tungpuchayakul, manager of the Thai-based nonprofit Labor Rights Promotion Network Foundation. "When you find there is a child working 16 hours a day and getting paid ($2.75) ... the government has to put a stop to this."

The peeling sheds that supply to major Thai seafood companies are supposed to be certified and inspected, but the stamp of approval does not always prevent abuses.

A factory just a few miles away from Tin Nyo Win's shed provided shrimp to companies including Thai Union; a half-dozen former workers said a Thai Union employee visited the shed every day. A runaway worker alerted a local migrant labor group about slave-like conditions there after being brutally beaten across his ear and throat with iron chains. Police raided the factory in May.

Former employees told the AP they had been locked inside and forced to work long hours with no days off and little sleep.

The conditions they described inside were horrific: A woman eight months pregnant miscarried on the shed floor and was forced to keep peeling for four days while hemorrhaging. An unconscious toddler was refused medical care after falling about 12 feet onto a concrete floor. Another pregnant woman escaped only to be tracked down, yanked into a car by her hair and handcuffed to a fellow worker at the factory.

"Sometimes when we were working, the tears would run down our cheeks because it was so tiring we couldn't bear it," said the worker who ran away. His name is being withheld due to concerns about his safety.

"We were crying, but we kept peeling shrimp," he said. "We couldn't rest. ... I think people are guilty if they eat the shrimp that we peeled like slaves."

Shrimp from that factory entered the supply chains of Thai Union, which, in the six months prior to the bust, shipped 15 million pounds of frozen shrimp to dozens of U.S. companies, customs records show. Those included Red Lobster and Darden Restaurants, which owns outlets such as Olive Garden, LongHorn Steakhouse and several other popular American chains.

The runaway worker was a free man after the May raid. But five months later, running low on cash with a pregnant wife, he felt desperate enough to look for a job in another shrimp factory. He hoped conditions would be better this time.

They weren't. His wages were withheld, and he ended up in the Gig factory peeling shrimp next to Tin Nyo Win — No. 31.

____

Modern-day slavery is often just part of doing business in Thailand's seafood export capital. Some shed owners believe they are providing jobs to poor migrant workers in need. Police are paid to look the other way and say officers frequently do not understand that practices such as forced labor and debt bondage are against the law.

"We just need to educate everyone on this issue," said Jaruwat Vaisaya, deputy commissioner of Bangkok's Metropolitan Police. "I don't think they know what they're doing is called human trafficking, but they must know it's wrong."

News surfaces about an abusive shed only when workers become so hopeless they're willing to risk everything to escape. Once on the street, without documentation, they are in some ways even more vulnerable. They face possible arrest and deportation or being resold.

After fleeing the Gig shed, Tin Nyo Win was alone. He didn't even know where the shed manager had taken his wife. He sought help from a local labor rights group, which prompted police to take action.

At dawn on Nov. 9, nearly two weeks after running away, he returned to the shed wearing dark glasses, a hat and a mask to keep the owners from recognizing him. He burst through the gate with dozens of officers and military troops, and frantically searched for his wife in the dim quarters on both floors of the maze-like complex.

Frightened Burmese workers huddled on the dirty concrete floor, the men and women separated. Some could be heard whispering: "That's 31. He came back." One young mother breast-fed a 5-month-old baby, while 17 children were taken to a corner.

Tin Nyo Win's wife was nowhere.

With law enforcement leading the way, it didn't take long to find her, though: Mi San was at a nearby fish factory. After being caught by the shed manager, she was taken to police. But instead of treating her as a trafficking victim, she said they put her back to work. Even as police and her husband escorted her out of the second factory, the Thai owner followed them into the street, complaining that Mi San still owed $22 for the pork and chicken she ate.

For Thai police, it looked like a victory in front of the cameras. But the story does not end there.

No one at the Gig shed was arrested for human trafficking, a law that's seldom enforced. Instead, migrants with papers, including seven children, were sent back there to work. Another 10 undocumented children were taken from their parents and put into a shelter, forced to choose between staying there for years or being deported back to Myanmar alone. Nineteen other illegal workers were detained.

Tin Nyo Win and his wife soon found out that not even whistleblowers are protected. Just four days after being reunited, the couple was fingerprinted and locked inside a Thai jail cell without even a mattress. They were held on nearly $4,000 bail and charged with entering the country illegally and working without permits.

Back at the shed where their nightmare began, a worker reached by phone pleaded for help as trucks loaded with slave-peeled shrimp continued to roll out.

____

Epilogue:

The Gig Peeling Factory is now closed, with workers moved to another shed linked to the same owners, said Chaiyuth Thomya, the superintendent of Samut Sakhon's main police station. A Gig owner reached by phone by the AP declined to comment.

Jaruwat, the Bangkok police official, was alerted to how the case was being handled and has ordered local authorities to re-investigate it for human trafficking, and arrests have since been made. Tin Nyo Win and his pregnant wife were released from jail 10 days after they were locked up and are now being housed in a government shelter for victims of human trafficking.

Chaiyuth called a meeting to explain human trafficking laws to nearly 60 shed owners, some of whom were confused about raids that swept up illegal migrants. Later, Chaiyuth quoted one shed owner as saying, "I'm not selling drugs, why did they take possession of my things?"

Meanwhile, the AP informed labor rights investigators who work closely with police about another shed where workers said they were being held against their will. It is being examined.

Source:-http://bigstory.ap.org/article/8f64fb25931242a985bc30e3f5a9a0b2/ap-global-supermarkets-selling-shrimp-peeled-slaves

Thursday, October 15, 2015

4th Pinot Noir & Mushrooms Wine Dinner | Friday October 30th, 2015 at 7:00 pm


What: 4th Pinot Noir & Mushrooms
When: Friday October 30th, 2015 at 7:00 pm
Where: Aroma Thyme Bistro, 165 Canal St, Ellenville NY

$59 per person
RSVP (845) 647-3000

Guenoc, California 2013
Spiced Creamy Mushroom Soup

Coppini, Maule Valley, Chile 2011
Roasted Oyster Mushrooms, Spinach & Goat Cheese
Sunflower Seeds, Sherry Vinaigrette

Liberty School, Central Valley 2012
“Lobster” Mushroom & Butternut Squash Risotto

RussoloGrifone, Venezia IGT 2013
Maitake Mushroom & Roasted Chicken with Cappellini
Artichokes & Walnut Pesto

Pinot Noir Cocktail
Sour Cherry Turnover

Pinot Noir is the primary red grape in France’s Burgundy region, and it makes some of the world’s most sought-after and age-worthy wines – particularly those from the limestone soils of the Côte d’Or. Each village there claims to produce wines with unique characteristics related to its particular terroir.
But great Pinot Noir wine is made in many locations. There are excellent examples from California’s Carneros and Russian River Valley regions, as well as Oregon’s Willamette Valley and New Zealand.
The best Pinot Noir boasts delicate, sometimes sour, cherry and strawberry flavors with some spice, presenting medium to low acidity and relatively light tannins. Oaked versions may also have smoke, vanilla and toast flavors, which develop with age. Winemakers rarely blend it, though Pinot Noir grapes are a key component in Champagne and other sparkling wines, where they add body and flavor, and color for rosé versions.
Pinot Noir, vulnerable to extreme cold, extreme heat, rot and vineyard pests, is relatively difficult to grow. The grapes’ thin skins demand exceptionally gentle handing to prevent damage to the final wine. The grape is so prone to mutation that it has even spawned entirely new varieties, including Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc and Pinot Meunier. As a result, farmers must select from dozens of Pinot clones when planting (the best known is the Pommard clone, named for the fabled Burgundy appellation). But farmers and winemakers endure these challenges because the final result, as you’ll see, is often very rewarding.

Monday, October 5, 2015

Naked Flock Beer Dinner | Friday October 16th, 2015 from 7pm to 10pm



What: Naked Flock Beer Dinner | Friday October 16th, 2015 from 7pm to 10pm
When: Friday October 16th, 2015
Where: Aroma Thyme Bistro, 165 Canal St, Ellenville NY 

4 Beers and 3 courses
$39 a person


Naked Flock Original Cider
no food


Naked Flock Lemon Ginger Cider

Local Cheeses
Raw Jersey Girl Cheddar & Chatham Camembert
 Lemon Ginger Apple Relish 


Naked Flock Citra Cider 
Apple Stuffed Pork Loin, Chamomile Mashed Potatoes
Maple glaze 


Naked Flock Pumpkin Cider
Pumpkin Pie Cheese Cake

Thursday, September 24, 2015

99 Bottles of Beer on the Bar Festival | Saturday, October 24th 2015, 1-5pm



Aroma Thyme's 4th Annual
Grand Beer Tasting

Saturday, October 24th 2015, 1-5pm

$29.99 a person

Where: Aroma Thyme Bistro, 165 Canal St, Ellenville NY 

Details: This is our annual grand tasting of craft beer at Aroma Thyme. 

This year will be better than ever! We are opening some awesome 10 year old vintage beers!
This is the best deal of any beer tasting, festival or party.
Join us for an insane line-up of world class craft beer under one roof.
Belgium, Germany, Italy, France, Switzerland, Brazil and all over the US

One low price of $29.99 gets you in to taste awesome craft beer
So join us for sure for 99 bottles of beer on the bar,
"Grand Craft Beer Tasting"


https://www.eventbrite.com/e/99-bottles-of-craft-beer-festival-tickets-18737606686
"Buy tickets online"

$25 a person before Oct 9th

$29.99 a person after Oct 9th


About Aroma Thyme www.AromaThymeBistro.com 
Aroma Thyme bistro opened in 2003 in Ellenville, NY, where the Catskills meet the Hudson Valley. Being green minded since day one, Aroma Thyme was the first Certified Green Restaurant© in upstate New York. Aroma Thyme has one of the best stocked bars with 250 craft beers, 250 fine wines & 250 boutique spirits. The restaurant is all about supporting local, but beyond that they pride themselves in small independent brands from all over the globe. This purchasing philosophy encompasses bar and kitchen alike. “We want to help a family pay for dance lessons for their daughter rather than a CEO's third vacation home”, says owners Jamie & Marcus Guiliano. Marcus Guiliano is an award winning chef who was named “One of the Five Top Food Activists Making a Change” from One Green Planet. This award, along with many others, is evident from the gourmet sustainable socially responsible cuisine Aroma Thyme serves. The restaurant has also been flooded with wards ranging from “Best New Restaurant”, “Best Organic Restaurant”, “Best Beer Events”, Wine Spectator “Award Winning Wine List” and Trip Advisors number one restaurant in their area. Aroma Thyme pleases carnivores and vegans alike. There is plenty of options for every diet and taste. Chef Marcus has several a great blogs that are a must to check out, ChefonaMission.com (his main one), NoFarmedSalmon.com (you will never eat farmed salmon again) and his award-winning business blog at 50Mistakes.com

Monday, September 21, 2015

Oktoberfest 2015 in the Hudson Valley | Saturday September 19th to Sunday October 4th


What: Oktoberfest 2015 in the Hudson Valley

When: Saturday September 19th to Sunday October 4th

Where: Aroma Thyme Bistro, 165 Canal St, Ellenville NY 12428

Details: 
Octoberfest beers on tap, flights or paired with food.  Ayinger Oktober Fest-Marzen, Hofbrau Oktoberfestbier &  Ayinger Celebrator  

Enjoy German themed food specials like: Spatzle, Sauerbraten, Schnitzel, Bratwurst & Sauerkraut 

Visit www.AromaThymeBistro.com for more info.  

Oktoberfest - In September?
Oktoberfest traditionally starts in the third weekend in September and ends the first sunday of October.
What is Oktoberfest?
It began with the Royal Wedding on 12 October 1810.

Crown Prince Ludwig, later to become King Ludwig I, was married to Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen on 12 October 1810. The citizens of Munich were invited to attend the festivities held on the fields in front of the city gates to celebrate the happy royal event. The fields were renamed Theresienwiese ("Theres'a Fields") to honor the Crown Princess, although the locals have since abbreviated the name simply to "Wiesn". Horse races in the presence of the royal family marked the close of the event that was celebrated as a festival for the whole of Bavaria. The decision to repeat the horse races in subsequest years gave rise to the tradition of Oktoberfest.
The Oktoberfest continues in 1811
In 1811, an added feature to the horse races was the first Agricultural Show, designed to boost Bavarian agriculture. The horse races, which were the oldest - and at one time - the most popular event of the festival are no longer held today. But the Agricultural Show is still held every three years during the Oktoberfest on the southern part of the festival grounds. 


About Aroma Thyme www.AromaThymeBistro.com 
Aroma Thyme bistro opened in 2003 in Ellenville, NY, where the Catskills meet the Hudson Valley. Being green minded since day one, Aroma Thyme was the first Certified Green Restaurant© in upstate New York. Aroma Thyme has one of the best stocked bars with 250 craft beers, 250 fine wines & 250 boutique spirits.  The restaurant is all about supporting local, but beyond that they pride themselves in small independent brands from all over the globe.  This purchasing philosophy encompasses bar and kitchen alike.  “We want to help a family pay for dance lessons for their daughter rather than a CEO's third vacation home”, says owners Jamie & Marcus Guiliano.  Marcus Guiliano is an award winning chef who was named “One of the Five Top Food Activists Making a Change” from One Green Planet. This award, along with many others, is evident from the gourmet sustainable socially responsible cuisine Aroma Thyme serves. The restaurant has also been flooded with wards ranging from “Best New Restaurant”, “Best Organic Restaurant”, “Best Beer Events”, Wine Spectator “Award Winning Wine List” and Trip Advisors number one restaurant in their area. Aroma Thyme pleases carnivores and vegans alike.  There is plenty of options for every diet and taste.  Chef Marcus has several a great blogs that are a must to check out, ChefonaMission.com (his main one), NoFarmedSalmon.com (you will never eat farmed salmon again) and his award-winning business blog at 50Mistakes.com. Reservations are always accepted at (845) 647-3000.  

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Troegs Beer Dinner | Friday September 18th, 2015 from 7 pm to 10pm


What: Troegs Beer Dinner

When: Friday September 18th, 2015

Where: Aroma Thyme Bistro, 165 Canal St, Ellenville NY 


We are featuring Troegs, a Pennsylvania brewery, for our September 2015 beer dinner. Troegs makes great beer and they not that far away. We look forward to their Mad Elf ever winter at Aroma Thyme. Here is the rundown for the dinner. Five courses with five beers. Dinner starts at 7pm. The price is $49 per person. Call 845 647 3000 to RSVP.


Hopback Amber Ale
Apple, Beet & Jersey Girl Cheddar Salad
Hazelnut Vinaigrette 

Hopknife  Harvest Ale
Thai Coconut Curry Noodle Soup

Troegenator Double Bock
Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Polenta 

Javahead Stout
Beer Braised Sirloin Tips  with Truffle Mashed Potatoes 

Scratch #192 Chocolate Stout
Chocolate Bread Pudding, Salted Caramel Drizzle 

About Troegs:

Chris and John Trogner have been working hard to get Central Pennsylvania on the brewing map. Since 1997, these Mechanicsburg natives have been handcrafting world-class beers that combine traditional English brewing techniques with the eclecticism of new American brewing. But how they reached this point is as compelling as where they are headed.

Chris and John, 18 months apart in age, were simultaneously intrigued by the art of handcrafting beer while living some 1,750 miles apart—Chris in Boulder, Colorado and John in Philadelphia.

John, the older brother, often found relief from his not-so-satisfying work in the Philadelphia real estate market at the nearby Dock Street Brewpub. At the same time, Philadelphia was proving to be a booming beer city with dozens of neighborhood bars that cared as much about beer as they did about food.

Chris was drawn to Colorado for the skiing opportunities, as well as educational ones. In between the two, he found himself in the midst of craft-brewing nirvana as more than 100 breweries appeared throughout the state.

As Chris and John would talk, a flicker of an idea gradually turned into a full-blown business plan. The brothers had always dreamed about starting a business together, and now they had brewed the perfect idea.

John moved to Boulder, and within days secured a job cleaning tanks at the Oasis Brewpub. Over the next three years he would learn the brewing business from the inside out. Along the way, he took brewing classes at the University of California at Davis and Chicago’s Siebel Institute of Technology.

With John knee-deep in yeast, hops and barley, Chris focused on marketing, sales and management classes. He also managed a restaurant to determine whether a brewpub or a brewery would be a better business model. The brothers decided to leave the food to someone else and focus on beer. After graduating, Chris went to England to take an intensive brewing class at the University of Sunderland.

The brothers needed to decide where to build the brewery; and while Colorado offered the right audience, it also meant a lot of competition. After a lot of thought, Chris and John decided to return to their roots and use their brewing skills in the Mid-Atlantic States.

Tröegs Brewing Company was established in 1997. Today, the brewery produces nine different beers including Hopback Amber Ale, Troegenator Doublebock, Rugged Trail Ale, Tröegs Pale Ale, Nugget Nectar (seasonal) Dead Reckoning Porter (seasonal), Sunshine Pils (seasonal), The Mad Elf (seasonal), and distributes its product in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Washington, D.C., Maryland, Delaware, Ohio, Massachusetts and Virginia.

We would never expect you to eat this shrimp, nor do we serve farmed Asian shrimp

One Awesome Blender

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